Monthly Archives: October 2011

Based on this plot, can you tell me when it started snowing? Or, can we fit a sine curve to it?

Now, I’m biased of course since I got a MS degree in Atmospheric Science, but I feel like weather and climate is one of the biggest untapped wells of potential math problems. I think there are two reasons for that … Continue reading

Posted in atmospheric science, sine waves, uncertainty, weather | 4 Comments

An artifact produced by my daughter, presented without commentary

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

An oversimplified model of an inquiry-based lesson, with visual aids

Last week, I mentioned that, having begun to attempt to slay one of the two giants of inquiry-based math instruction, I’d be steering into a potentially trickier aspect of inquiry based instruction: namely that of instruction and facilitation. Most of … Continue reading

Posted in commentary, inquiry based instruction, problem based learning | 3 Comments

Inquiry-Based instruction, in a PNG-nutshell

In talking to math teachers about an Inquiry- , Project- , or Problem-Based approach, these are the following questions that come up most often. 1) “How am I supposed to cover all the standards using this approach?“ and, 2) “So, … Continue reading

Posted in commentary, inquiry based instruction, problem based learning | 6 Comments

7th and 8th Grade additions to the Great Inquiry-Based Curriculum Mapping Project

If you haven’t read last week’s introductory post or description of the Great Inquiry-Based Curriculum Mapping Project, please do so. Here’s the short description: there are some open google docs that tie math standards to activities, problems, projects, blog-posts and/or … Continue reading

Posted in crowd-sourcing | Leave a comment