About Geoff

Geoff Krall is an experienced educator, blogger, author, speaker, professional developer and mathematician. He taught math in Texas for eight years before moving to Colorado to obtain a masters degree. After that, he joined the New Tech Network of schools as a Math Coach, delivering coaching, training, and professional development to teachers across the country. While there he pioneered Problem-Based Learning as the primary mode of instruction at NTN schools, training hundreds of teachers and dozens of colleagues along the way. 

His first book, Necessary Conditions: Teaching Secondary Math with Academic Safety, Quality Tasks, and Effective Facilitation was published in 2018 and is currently available from Stenhouse Publishers. 

About the website

Feel free to poke around the website. You can check out the blog, featured postsGeoff’s problem based curriculum maps, or check out Geoff’s Professional Development Services page. Below you’ll find a list of Geoff’s publications and presentations.

You can email Geoff or follow him on twitter. Or use the contact page to get in touch.

Memberships and Professional Responsibilities

  • Associate Editor, Colorado Mathematics Teacher. (2017-Present)
  • Mathematics Support Coach, Arvada High School
  • National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Member
  • TODOS Mathematics for ALL, Member

Publications

Krall, G. (2020). Student Math Portfolios—A How to. Mathematics Teacher: Learning and Teaching PK-12, 113(7), e8–e9. https://doi.org/10.5951/MTLT.2019.0382

Krall, G. (2018). Necessary Conditions: Teaching Secondary Math with Academic Safety, Quality Tasks, and Effective Facilitation. Stenhouse Publishers.

Presentations

Clark County Schools Secondary Math Conference 2021: The Care Gap: How Math Creates It and How We Can Use Math to Close It (Keynote Speaker)

NCTM Annual Conference 2021, St. Louis (Accepted): Inquiry: Plain and Tall

NCTM Virtual Conference 2020: The Care Gap: How Math Creates It and How We Can Use Math to Close It

Mt. Holyoke Effective Practices Session (Webinar) 2019: Inquiry: Plain and Tall

NCTM Regional Conference – Boston 2019: Fantastic Tasks and Where to Find Them

CCTM Annual Conference 2019: Fantastic Tasks and Where to Find Them

NCTM Regional Conference 2018 – Seattle: Necessary Conditions: Essential Elements for Secondary Math Learning

NCTM Shadowcon 2017: The Art of Mathematical Anthropology

NCTM Annual Conference 2017: The Struggle Is Real: Tasks, Academic Status, and Productive Problem-Solving

NCTM Annual Conference 2016: Fumbling Towards Inquiry: Starting Strong in Problem-Based Learning

Global Math Department 2015: Designing Systems of Teacher Learning around Student Work

NCTM Regional Conference 2015 – Nashville, TN: Fumbling Towards Inquiry: Starting Strong in Problem-Based Learning

Northwest Math Conference 2015, Whistler, BC (featured): Problem-Based Learning Institute

Northwest Math Conference 2015, Whistler, BC: Toward Problem-Based Learning: A Quick Look

New Tech Annual Conference 2015, Chicago, IL: Fumbling Towards Inquiry: Starting Strong in Problem-Based Learning

NCTM Annual Conference 2015, Boston, MA: Adaptation: Developing Open Problems from Closed Curricula

NCTM Annual Conference 2014, New Orleans: Setting the Scene: Designing Your Problem-Based Classroom

Equip Conference 2013, Plymouth, IN: Designing Mathematical Tasks

North Carolina New Schools Scaling STEM Conference 2012: Toward Developing Mathematical Thinkers: Problem-Based Learning

North Carolina New Schools Scaling STEM Conference 2012: Getting Students to Struggle (and Engage) With Math

7 thoughts on “About

  1. Hi, Geoff – I have a question from our engineering design teacher. I sent your Retrospectus out to all our faculty and in reading it, she found Nguyen used as an adjective in several places. Can you tell me what it is in reference to? Thanks for your help!

    1. Fawn Nguyen is a prolific teacher and blogger (http://fawnnguyen.com/, twitter: @fawnpnguyen). Her last name is pronounced “win”. So therefore Nguyen = win. When you do something good, that’s a huge “Nguyen”. 🙂

  2. Oh, and you’re not currently a teacher, either, Geoff. Yet I would not rule you out as having useful things to say about technology in classrooms.

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