Math Syllabus Bootcamp Part 4: Anchor Problems. A Hilbert-ian approach to curriculum mapping

In 1900, mathematician David Hilbert famously published 23 as yet unsolved math problems. The problems covered a large swath of math fields. They served as a challenge and inspiration for 20th century mathematicians.  I propose taking that same approach to laying out your content units for the year.  Most syllabi showcase content via unit titles: … Continue reading Math Syllabus Bootcamp Part 4: Anchor Problems. A Hilbert-ian approach to curriculum mapping

Math Syllabus Bootcamp Part 2: Smartness. What does it mean to be a mathematician?

In Part 1 of this mini-series, we looked at how we can promote diverse identities in mathematics from the first artifacts students see: you, your syllabus, and your classroom. Here in Part 2, we’ll examine the mathematical habits, behaviors, and skills that ensure students will be able to participate fully. Like with identity, students and … Continue reading Math Syllabus Bootcamp Part 2: Smartness. What does it mean to be a mathematician?

Math Syllabus Bootcamp Part 1: Identity. Who is a Mathematician?

Part 1: Identity: Who is a mathematician?  (Good morning and welcome to Math Syllabus Bootcamp! This is Part One of a five part Emergent Math mini-series. Today’s topic is on how to incorporate and welcome diverse identities from the very outset of the school year. Be sure to check out the other parts of this … Continue reading Math Syllabus Bootcamp Part 1: Identity. Who is a Mathematician?

Active Caring (and Epilogue): the essential ingredient

This is a post in the ongoing Emergent Math mini-series: Routines, Lessons, Problems, and Projects. As we stand on the balcony and gaze out at our own version of the MCU (Math Class Universe) that consists of Routines, Lessons, Problems, and Projects, we must be sure we're not missing the crucial ingredient that stitches it … Continue reading Active Caring (and Epilogue): the essential ingredient

Projects: what they’ll remember in 20 years

This is a post in the ongoing Emergent Math mini-series: Routines, Lessons, Problems, and Projects. I graduated high school twenty years ago this year. What's remarkable is how little I actually remember about my classes. I remember certain feelings I had towards particular teachers or classes, but not the actual classroom action itself. There are three exceptions. … Continue reading Projects: what they’ll remember in 20 years

Routines, Lessons, Problems, and Projects: the DNA of your math classroom

This blog post introduces a new mini-series from Emergent Math: Routines, Lessons, Problems, and Projects. In my time in math classrooms - my own and others' - I've developed a rough taxonomy of activities. Think of these as the Four Elements of a math class: the "Earth, Air, Fire, Water" of math as it were. … Continue reading Routines, Lessons, Problems, and Projects: the DNA of your math classroom