Transversals Lesson: Street Views

The following Problem Based math lesson covers the concept of transversals crossing parallel lines and their angle relationships. The scenario of the task predicated on needing to determine "safe" and "troublesome" intersections in town. Intersections that are closer to right angles are deemed "safe," while intersections with extreme angles result in limited-vision turns. But that … Continue reading Transversals Lesson: Street Views

Routines, Lessons, Problems, and Projects: the DNA of your math classroom

This blog post introduces a new mini-series from Emergent Math: Routines, Lessons, Problems, and Projects. In my time in math classrooms - my own and others' - I've developed a rough taxonomy of activities. Think of these as the Four Elements of a math class: the "Earth, Air, Fire, Water" of math as it were. … Continue reading Routines, Lessons, Problems, and Projects: the DNA of your math classroom

Counting Idling Cars: An Elementary Math Project Based Learning Unit

I'm sitting in my car, waiting to pick up my son from school. It's too cold to wait outside  this time of year so I keep the heat on, the engine running, and continue listening to the Dunc'd On Basketball Podcast, the nerdiest podcast about basketball out there. I'm also quite anti-social, so I prefer … Continue reading Counting Idling Cars: An Elementary Math Project Based Learning Unit

Systems of Linear Inequalities: Paleontological Dig

(Editor's note: the original post and activity mistook Paleontology for Archaeology. Archaeology is the study of human made fossils; paleontology is the study of dinosaur remains. The terminology has since been corrected and updated. Thanks to the commenters for the newfound knowledge.)  Here's an activity on systems of inequalities that teaches or reinforces the following concepts: … Continue reading Systems of Linear Inequalities: Paleontological Dig

Just how high was the Big Thompson Flood? And how often will a flood like that occur?

Recently, the family and I were taking in an afternoon in Boulder, CO. After taking in a lunch at the lovely Dushanbe Tea Room we took a stroll along Boulder Creek. Right by a retaining wall stands this object. This monument demarcates how high the waters rise for a flood of various magnitude. Zooming in … Continue reading Just how high was the Big Thompson Flood? And how often will a flood like that occur?